Gifted and Talented Homepage

Teacher/Staff Contact:

 I am most easily reached by e-mail at dawn.phillips@marion.kyschools.us  However, I can be reached by phone at the individul schools.  Please see the Important Information page for a copy of my schedule with phone numbers included.

 

Reason to Celebrate

"Woot Woot"

 

This is Endangered Species Day!

 

 

Trivia Question of the Day

????

Music- What musical instrument's sales escalated from 228,000 in 1950 to 2.3 million in 1971?


 Yesterday's Answer:  George Washington

 

 

Freaky Fact

The Sprout pencil is a plantable pencil that contains a seed inside. When it's too short to use, you can plant it and watch it grow herbs and vegetables.

 

 

Student Tip of the Week

5/16/16 - 5/20/16

Going away to Camp

 

Friends, Fun, Learning, Independence

Going to sleepaway camp is a summertime tradition for many kids. It's called sleepaway camp because you stay overnight there. Kids typically stay at sleepaway camp for a week or longer.

You might go to a traditional camp, where kids swim, do crafts, put on plays, and sit around the campfire at night. Or maybe you're going to a special-interest camp, where you'll work on your sports skills, or learn more about computers, outer space, or art. There are even camps that serve kids who have the same health problem, such as asthma or diabetes.

No matter which kind of sleepaway camp you're going to, you're probably excited — and maybe a little nervous if it's your first time. Be proud of yourself for being grown-up enough to go to camp. It's a chance to try new things, like horseback riding, canoeing, playing tennis, or dancing in a dance contest!

But camp is even more than just friends and fun. It's also an opportunity to learn a little more about being independent. Read on to learn how to get prepared for a memorable camp experience.

Different From Day Camp

Many kids go to day camps during the summer. They can be a lot of fun, but the schedule is familiar. You start camp in the morning and go home in the afternoon. Sometimes, a bus takes you or you might get a ride from one of your parents or someone else's parents. Like anything, it might take you a little while to get adjusted to the place, the camp counselors, and the kids. But you come home every night, just like you do during the school year.

Sleepaway camp offers some additional excitement because you'll be there all day and night, eating your meals there and sleeping over. It's a kind of vacation, but without your parents. You'll probably sleep in a cabin or dorm with other kids attending the camp. You'll probably eat together in a large cafeteria and you'll have to share the bathroom with the other kids.

Some sleepaway camps are coed, which means that there are both boys and girls at the camp. (They have separate cabins for sleeping, though.) Other camps are just for girls or just for boys, but often these all-girl and all-boy camps meet up for dances and parties.

Usually, the camp mails out information to your family before you go, so you'll know what to bring. You'll also probably need to have your doctor fill out a health assessment for you, so the camp can be sure your shots are up to date and camp counselors know about any health problems you have.

Just like any vacation, you'll need to pack a bag (or two) full of the clothes and other stuff you'll need while you're there. Food is generally provided, but you might need some extra money for snacks or other small expenses.

Who Takes Care of You at Camp?

Camp counselors (who are usually grown-ups and older teens) will be on hand to lead activities and keep you safe, just like your parents would at home. For instance, if you scrape your knee, a camp counselor can help you get it cleaned up and bandaged. And if you get sick, a counselor could call a doctor and your parents.

But best of all, camp counselors help kids have fun at camp. They organize the camp activities and set the schedule for days and evenings.

Counselors and other grown-ups at camp are responsible for taking care of you, but campers can do a lot to take care of themselves. This means following the safety rules when it comes to activities, such as swimming and boating. You'll want to take it seriously when a counselor tells you not to wander away from the group when you're on a hike in the woods.

Campers can do other smart things, such as remembering to put on sunscreen and bug spray. And camp counselors will be delighted if you make an effort to keep your cabin neat and throw trash in the trash can.

Packing

What you need to pack for camp depends on the type of camp and how long you'll be there. But remember that you won't need 30 pairs of underwear, even if you'll be there 30 days. If you're going to have a long stay, your camp counselor will let you know how to handle laundry.

Some of the typical items that everyone needs for camp are:

  • sweatshirts and T-shirts
  • shorts, jeans, and long pants
  • swimsuits
  • raincoat
  • sneakers
  • walking boots
  • socks and underwear
  • sheets and towels
  • toothbrush and toothpaste
  • shampoo, soap, and any other toiletries you may use
  • sunscreen (at least SPF 15)
  • bug spray (especially for mosquitoes)
  • paper and pen to write to family and friends
  • sports equipment (tennis racquet, swimming cap, goggles, etc.)
  • any medications you regularly take
  • quarters (for calling home on a pay phone, laundry, and snacks)

It's wise to label all your clothes and belongings because it's easy to lose things at camp. If you leave something behind, it can be returned to you when your name is on it. And if you and your friend own the same beach towel, you'll be able to tell which one is yours.

It's also nice to pack a small reminder of home, such as a photo of your family or your favorite pet. These will come in handy if you start to miss them.

Who Knew You'd Miss Home?

With so much to do, it's tough to be bored at camp. But you might find that you feel a little homesick. Homesickness is the feeling of missing your everyday familiar life, like your parents, your dog, your room, and maybe even your brother or sister. The good news is that you might be able to call home to talk with your family. There also may be a special day or weekend at camp when family members come to visit.

In the meantime, email or write letters to your family and friends. If you're feeling down, it can help to talk with other campers or your counselors about your feelings. But it's also OK if you don't feel lonely because you're too busy having fun. That's the idea, after all.

Have a great time at camp!

http://teenshealth.org/en/kids/going-to-camp.html?WT.ac=ctg#

 

 

Teacher Tip of the Week

5/16/16 - 5/20/16

Five Tips for Spring Cleaning the Classroom

Just as your house needs a little dusting and sprucing up when the warm weather hits, so does your classroom. Sure, I wipe things down and dust when it becomes noticeable, but the big, deep, classroom cleaning usually happens for me in the spring. Once spring break comes and goes, there isn’t much time until summer vacation. I’m one of those people who likes to draw out my summer vacation for as long as possible and don't want to spend any of it in my classroom. So, that means that I start preparing for the next school year in the spring, and what better way to do that than to Spring Clean. Here are my five favorite tips for spring cleaning the classroom.

Getting the Kids to Help

Little kids love to help. Give them a few baby wipes to wipe down shelves and watch that dust disappear. A feather duster does wonders for the computer area, especially the keyboard. Don’t forget the little brooms and dustpans; these are great for kids to use around the classroom. My students make it a competition to see who can sweep up the most dirt. Our classroom also has a small vacuum, and the kids all want a turn to use it. If only their desire to vacuum carried over to their teenage years. . . .

Use shaving cream to clean the tabletops and have some fun at the same time. Just squirt a bit onto each table and let the kids smear it around, then have them practice writing letters, numbers, or sight words in it with their fingers. When most of it has dissolved, let the kids wash up while you use some paper towels to wipe off the remaining residue. 

Reorganize Those Cupboards

It doesn’t take long to sift through your teacher resource materials and purge what you haven’t used in years or has become outdated. If your cupboard shelves aren’t already organized by subject matter, now is the time. To do this, grab a few empty plastic bins and start sorting your resource books by subject matter: math, writing, reading comprehension, and so forth. I have made labels in my cupboards to define the areas the books are in. This is helpful for when colleagues want to borrow a book; they can look in the correct area and find it quickly. Take those leftover, unwanted materials to the freebie table at your school, offer them to student teachers, or drop them off at the local thrift shop. If you are keeping a book because you really like the three pages in the middle, make a copy of those pages and dump the book. 

I took organizing my teacher read-aloud collection in a different direction. I have these books organized by the months of the year. In September I read a large number of books that have school as the main theme. For some months I have quite a few books for a particular category; I have placed these books inside a magazine file box.

File Cabinets

I remember the days when my file cabinets were beautifully organized — they were even color-coded. As time went on and I moved grade levels a few times, my files seemed to get the best of me. 

Clean out those files, reorganize, and downsize. Go through your files and purge what is outdated and irrelevant. Consider sprucing up your file cabinet with some colored files to designate specific subject areas. If you don’t think you have enough time during the school day to rummage through the file drawers, grab an empty paper box. They are the perfect size to hold files and take your files home. You can sift and sort at home while you are catching up on the latest television re-runs or while you’re at your kid's little league practice.

If you really feel as though your files need a change, you might consider the system I am currently using. I never seemed to have time to re-file all of my paper and had a terrible time sifting through the file drawers. I now store the majority of my most used masters in three-ring binders with sheet protectors. Now when I need to photocopy something, I take the entire binder with me to the copy room. I make my copies and put the binder back on the shelf. No more baskets of files waiting to be put away.

Organize Those Drawers

Drawers tend to be the catchall for unwanted items that were once strewn across a counter. My classroom is limited on drawer space. I have to make the most of what little space I have. In my drawers you will find a vast amount of diverse items, from rubber bands and paper clips to ballpoint pens, stickers, and hole punches. To help keep everything neat, tidy, and in its designated space, I use small plastic baskets. Although it took a few attempts, I managed to get all the baskets into the drawers with very little wiggle room. When I first started this task, I emptied out all of my drawers and put like things together. I found that I had multiples of the same item. How many staple removers does a person really need? I had six.

Disinfect and Deodorize

Have you ever wondered just how many germs there might be on that computer mouse, water fountain, or door handle? Now that cold and flu season is behind us, it’s time to get rid of those germs once and for all. Using disinfectant wipes, swipe across the areas in your classroom that are touched by multiple people multiple times per day. Let’s face it: kindergartners and kids in general don’t have fabulous hygiene habits. Who knows where those little fingers have been? 

With some help from the kids and some quick reorganizing, your classroom will sparkle through the remainder of the school year.

By Tiffani Mugurussa on March 26, 2013

http://www.scholastic.com/teachers/top-teaching/2013/03/five-tips-spring-cleaning-classroom

 

 

 

Parent Tip of the Week

5/16/16 - 5/20/16

Road Trip Boredom Busters

The family road trip can be a time to bond and learn about each other's interests and points of view — or an ordeal that makes you want to scream every time you hear "Are we there yet?" from your kids.

A road trip can be a fun, educational, and sane experience with just a little planning, creativity, and preparation. Sure, electronic games, apps, and portable DVD players are great distractions. But don't overlook these family-friendly games and activities that can keep everyone happy as the miles go by.

Can-Do Cards

Don't underestimate the power of a deck of cards. It presents endless possibilities for all ages and can provide hours of entertainment and concentration. If your kids are sick of the standard Go Fish, Crazy Eights, and Rummy games, buy — or borrow from your local library — a kids' card games book for new ideas. Or buy a deck of quiz or trivia cards to keep their brains busy.

Contest Craze

Hold an official family spelling bee or trivia contest using index cards to write down words or questions. Winners can earn trinkets, stickers, activity or coloring books, trading cards, food treats, money (the younger the child, the smaller the amount), or extra minutes of hotel pool time or stay-up-late time.

Good Ol' Games

Use the fallback road-trip games — 20 Questions, the License Plate Game, and I Spy.

Try the Alphabet Game. Pick a topic (for instance, animals) and a letter (A), then have everyone name animals that begin with that letter, like aardvark, antelope, ape. The best thing about this game is that kids can pick a topic of interest — cars, TV characters, countries, cities, foods, names, etc. — and there are 26 possibilities (one for each letter) for every topic.

Make the games into marathons, awarding special treats or trinkets to whoever wins each round. Then have lightning rounds or finals for extra-special awards.

Journal Jotting

Buy cheap but sturdy journals (or use plain notebooks or create your own from construction paper, hole puncher, and yarn) and have kids write down and describe what they see along the way. Have them collect something small (a stone, a seashell, a flower, etc.) or buy a super-small trinket from rest stops (buttons, stickers, postcards, etc.) to glue into their journal, describing each stop and each location or landmark they pass.

Bring along a stack of old magazines and have kids cut out and paste pictures into their journals to illustrate some of what they've seen (cows, fire trucks, palm trees, deer, cars, etc.). Give each kid a disposable camera to capture their own memories and keep the pictures in their personal road-trip journals.

Make It Magnetic

Stock up on a few super-cheap magnetic games (like tic-tac-toe, checkers, etc.) at the local dollar store or at gift shops along the way.

Map Quest

Bring a large map (or smaller map book that little hands can better handle) just for the kids. Have them use stickers and highlighters to mark each road you take on your journey.

Road Trip Box to the Rescue

Find a sturdy cardboard box or hat box (one for each child) and paint the top with chalkboard paint (black or green). Stock the box with tons of handy-dandy arts and crafts items and playthings: chalk, chalkboard eraser, washable markers, crayons, pocket-sized coloring books, colored pencils, scrap paper, mini dry erase board, dry erase marker and cloth eraser, construction paper, stickers, stencils, colored pipe cleaners, Popsicle sticks, tape, colored tape, mini pom-poms, child-safe scissors, hole puncher, yarn, and small dolls or action figures.

Tales Aplenty

Bring a few of your kids' favorite books — or those they've been wanting to read — both in the printed versions and audiobooks. You can listen to the story as the kids read along.

If you'd rather not spend the money, visit the library to check out copies of the books and music before you go. Or just bring the books and take turns reading the stories out loud (making sure to use your best character voices, of course).

Team Storytelling

Ask each family member to create a line for a story (e.g.,"There once was a boy name Hugh..."), then have everyone add a line until you're all stumped ("who lived in the town's biggest zoo" ... "he often had nothing to do" ... "so he decided to make an igloo" ... "with a big polar bear named Sue"...).

To make things really interesting, go as fast as you can, rhyme as much as possible, and take turns out of order (pointing to someone new each time). Write down the story as you go, then have kids create drawings to coordinate with your silly tale. When you're done, you'll have your own custom-made family story.

Window Gallery

Use washable window markers to make colorful creations that even passersby can enjoy, or to play endless, paper-free games like tic-tac-toe and hangman. Keep a cotton cloth or dust rag handy so kids can keep the window fun going throughout the trip — just make sure the driver's view isn't blocked!

Wordplay

Have kids write down various words they see as you drive along (from billboards, bumper stickers, roadside attractions and stores, license plates, signs, the sides of trucks, etc.). Ask them to write a story, poem, or song grouping all of the words they see together. Have them read, perform, or sing their creation for everyone when they're done.

A little creativity and planning can cut down on the fighting and fussing and leave fond family memories of your time together — on the road and off.

Long road trips are a great time to put kids' imaginations to the test to create puppets, masks, journals, and more.

Silence Is Golden

When all else fails, use the standby game "See Who Can Be the Quietest." After hours of singing and crafting, your little ones just might appreciate the challenge of not saying a peep. Make prizes worth their while, with incentives such as money (quarters, a dollar), gift-shop trinkets or games, and a few extra minutes at the hotel pool or staying up a few minutes longer that night.

Sing, Sing a Song

Bone up on sing-along songs. Or buy or make a playlist of "round" songs (like "Row, Row, Row Your Boat," "Three Blind Mice," etc.) or sing-along/participation songs ("Old MacDonald," "B-I-N-G-O") that will get everyone — even the most tone-deaf — involved. Buy a kazoo or plastic harmonica for every family member for added accompaniment.

Tales Aplenty

Bring a few of your kids' favorite books — or those they've been wanting to read — both in the printed versions and audiobooks. You can listen to the story as the kids read along.

If you'd rather not spend the money, visit the library to check out copies of the books and music before you go. Or just bring the books and take turns reading the stories out loud (making sure to use your best character voices, of course).

Team Storytelling

Ask each family member to create a line for a story (e.g.,"There once was a boy name Hugh..."), then have everyone add a line until you're all stumped ("who lived in the town's biggest zoo" ... "he often had nothing to do" ... "so he decided to make an igloo" ... "with a big polar bear named Sue"...).

To make things really interesting, go as fast as you can, rhyme as much as possible, and take turns out of order (pointing to someone new each time). Write down the story as you go, then have kids create drawings to coordinate with your silly tale. When you're done, you'll have your own custom-made family story.

Window Gallery

Use washable window markers to make colorful creations that even passersby can enjoy, or to play endless, paper-free games like tic-tac-toe and hangman. Keep a cotton cloth or dust rag handy so kids can keep the window fun going throughout the trip — just make sure the driver's view isn't blocked!

Wordplay

Have kids write down various words they see as you drive along (from billboards, bumper stickers, roadside attractions and stores, license plates, signs, the sides of trucks, etc.). Ask them to write a story, poem, or song grouping all of the words they see together. Have them read, perform, or sing their creation for everyone when they're done.

A little creativity and planning can cut down on the fighting and fussing and leave fond family memories of your time together — on the road and off

http://teenshealth.org/en/parents/road-trip.html?WT.ac=ctg#

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